Tag Archives: boys

Upcycled: Boy’s Baggies (Shorts)

Welcome back to week two of Upcycled: Learn to Sew Your Kid’s Wardrobe. Today I’m going to share with you my new go-to shorts for boys. And you can make your own from a shirt, sweatshirt, or pants.  Are you ready?!
Upcycled Boy's Shorts {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

This is the third time I’ve made these shorts, and I love the results every time. My first edition ran a bit large since the pattern indicated 2/3 T, and Carpenter wears a 4/5. I enlarged the pattern, and the shorts were way too big on him. So, the next time, I kept the pattern just the way it was, and they helped complete my Project Run and Play look back in February.

Today’s version is slightly different since I upcycled them from 95% from this polo shirt and 5% from the lime green shirt I used for Carpenter’s raglan.  So, grab yourself a polo shirt and the pattern and make some awesome shorts!

Pattern
Boy’s Baggies by Designs by Sessa

{Disclosure: These are not our patterns, and we don’t claim any rights to them. They are kindly offered for free by the pattern designers. The patterns and tutorials must be obtained at the pattern designers’ sites.}

Instructions

I started with this short-sleeve men’s XL polo:

Upcycled Baggie Shorts {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

Cut down the sides of the shirt:Upcycled Baggie Shorts {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}Since this shirt was striped, I wanted to make sure the stripes would line up perfectly on my “new” shorts. It was pretty funny that the original stripes on the shirt didn’t even line up perfectly! Just another reason to give yourself some credit when sewing – not even mass-produced clothes are perfect.

I wanted to make sure I used the original hem of these shorts, so I started lining up the stripes beginning with the bottom and worked my way up from there.

Upcycled Baggie Shorts {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

Here are the short’s front panels. You can see there’s a little bit of white stripe at the top of the right piece, but it will get hidden once I place the waistband over it. Upcycled Baggie Shorts {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

Also, since I was using the same stripe fabric for the inside of the pocket, I wanted to make sure the front pattern piece’s stripes matched up with the inner pocket piece’s stripes. I simply placed the original shirt down first, then the pocket pattern piece, and then lined up the short’s front piece on top as you can see here:

Upcycled Baggie Shorts {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

I maneuvered the pieces…and made the stripes line up!

Next, I cut off the collar of this shirt to use as the waistband. I love how Vanessa from Designs by Sessa also uses an old shirt for her baggies too – and here she uses the bottom of the terry pullover for the waistband.Upcycled Baggie Shorts {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

And remember my son’s raglan made from this shirt:Upcycled Raglan for Boys {Sew Thrifty| www.sewthrifty.org}

I cut off the lime neckband to use as the ribbing/bias binding for the pockets. Other than that, I followed Designs by Sessa’s tutorial and finished my shorts.

Upcycled Lime Raglan and Baggies {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

Upcycled Boy's Baggy Shorts {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org} Upcycled Boy's Baggy Shorts {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

Here’s the breakdown:Upcycled Striped Baggies Time and Cost {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

Feather’s Flights has some awesome shorts and pants today as well! Go check out her denim shorts and cargo pants for some inspiration.
Upcycled: Learn to Sew Your Kid's Wardrobe. A Series by Feather's Flights (feathersflights.com) and Sew Thrifty (sewthrifty.org)Are you enjoying our upcycled series? Have you made any clothes for your kids, grandkids, nieces, nephews, friends’ kids out of thrifted or used clothing? We would love to see them! Tag #upcycledkid on Instagram and see what others are creating too.

Upcycled: Raglan for Boys

Do you ever realize how many free or event-related shirts you amass over the years? Today’s tutorial will show you  how to make use of those shirts for your kids.

This post is the second of my versions of  the Raglan Shirt Pattern by Nap-Time Creations.  You can view my girl’s version of the raglan here.

{Disclosure: These are not our patterns, and we don’t claim any rights to them. They are kindly offered for free by the pattern designers. The patterns and tutorials must be obtained at the pattern designers’ sites.}

Upcycled Boy Raglan {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

Both the gray and lime fabrics came from shirts with over-sized graphics. These are very common with shirts you can receive for donating money, company shirts, or team shirts. Some of these shirts are sentimental, but others are just filling up your closet…or your trash pile. Now, there’s something you can do with them!

Upcycled Raglan for Boys {Sew Thrifty| www.sewthrifty.org}

This shirt was a friend’s that she and her whole family had worn in support of March for Babies. An awesome cause, but she didn’t need 5 of these matching shirts past the day of the walk. She kindly packed up this one and many others and delivered them free to my house. Free fabric! Free delivery! I have the best friends.

Upcycled Raglan for Boys {Sew Thrifty| www.sewthrifty.org}

Because the graphic on the back was so large, I could only use this shirt for the front in the size I needed. There was still some leftover on the back that I’ll use for other small projects.Upcycled Raglan for Boys {Sew Thrifty| www.sewthrifty.org}

As you can see above, I folded my t-shirt and lined up the bottom of the pattern to the bottom of the shirt. Since I didn’t have to bother with hemming the shirt, I could have slid the pattern piece down to account for not hemming. However, I like longer shirts (makes them last longer on my constantly-growing kiddos), so I kept the pattern piece as pictured above to gain an extra inch or so. Upcycled Raglan for Boys {Sew Thrifty| www.sewthrifty.org}

For the sleeve, I did slide the pattern piece off the edge of the t-shirt’s original sleeve. I wanted a short-sleeve shirt and nothing longer than that.

Upcycled Raglan for Boys {Sew Thrifty| www.sewthrifty.org}

I did the same cutting process for the back of the shirt and cut off the neckband of this gray shirt to use for my final raglan.

Also, since I used the original hem of the shirts, when I serged my shirt together, I ended up with a tail of additional thread. (This will also happen if you’re using a sewing machine, although if you back stitch your seams should stay put.) When using a serger, I use this method to keep my thread tails from coming apart:

Finishing Serger Hems {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

 

 

And now the shirt is completely done and ready to be worn!Upcycled Lime Raglan and Baggies {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

Upcycled Lime Raglan and Baggies {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

Upcycled Lime Raglan and Baggies {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

And I know you saw those awesome shorts up there! Don’t worry, those will be coming next week.

Here’s the breakdown:

Upcycled Boy's Raglan {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

Check out what Feather’s Flights is up to today with her peasant style tunic!

Upcycled: Learn to Sew Your Kid's Wardrobe. A Series by Feather's Flights (feathersflights.com) and Sew Thrifty (sewthrifty.org)

Have you upcycled any garments for your kids? Tag #upcycledkid on Instagram so we can see all the awesomeness you are creating! Or share a link in the comments.

Upcycled: Colorblocked Muscle Tee

Today I’m going to share with you my first of many projects! I will be transforming two adult tees into a tank for my son – all for less than 25 cents.

But first, have you seen what upcycling can save you? And how you can get the most out of your material?
Colorblocked Muscle Tee {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

{Disclosure: These are not our patterns, and we don’t claim any rights to them. They are kindly offered for free by the pattern designers. The patterns and tutorials must be obtained at the pattern designers’ sites.}

Using Fishsticks Designs’ free Tank pattern, I mashed up two adult shirts to make this fun new one! The stumbling block I came across was that the graphic I wanted to keep from the original shirt was too close to the edge of the tank’s pattern piece. If I had cut up the original shirt, I would have sewed the graphic right into the seams, losing the look I was aiming for. Color blocking to the rescue! If you’ve ever had this same problem, read on to see how you can keep those fun (maybe even sentimental?) graphics from shirts past….

I snagged this long sleeve maroon shirt from my husband’s wardrobe long ago knowing Carpenter would love it one day. (Don’t worry, my husband gave me full permission!) And, today is the day!  I showed him the graphic on the back and he said, “Bam! Cars!” He is not one to shy away from crashing, smashing, and all sorts of collisions; this shirt fits him well. 🙂

Upcycled Colorblock Tank {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

You can see below that if I used only this maroon shirt, I would have cut right along the side of the graphic from the back of the shirt. And, I couldn’t move the pattern piece up, since there’s no more shirt to move to!

Upcycled Colorblock Tank {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

Luckily, I had a matching shirt in my stash of clothes to upcycle (it might just be larger than my fabric stash, but who’s counting?). So, I decided the best solution was to color-block the two shirts. Instead of making a new pattern piece or printing off another one, I simply folded down the piece, making sure the pattern matched up on the fold (this will ensure that the angle is at 90 degrees, and your pattern pieces will be perfectly horizontal).

Upcycled Colorblock Tank {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}(This is the top half of the pattern piece used for my yellow shirt)

You’ll then have the other part of the pattern to be used for the maroon/graphic part of the shirt:Upcycled Colorblock Tank {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

First, I took the top part of the pattern piece and laid it on my yellow shirt to be upcycled. You can see the pin on the right – that is marking the fold in my pattern piece. I will add a seam allowance of approximately 3/8″ (or 1 cm) below that pin.

Upcycled Colorblock Tank {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

The top of my tank all cut out – the pin still in place, marking the original pattern piece, and you can see where I added seam allowance all along the bottom. (I repeated this step for the front pattern piece of my tank.)

Upcycled Colorblock Tank {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

Next, I prepared the bottom sections of my tank. (I’m showing you the front piece, but I did the same process for the back of the tank as well.) Using the bottom piece of my pattern, I placed it on top of my original shirt, making sure it did not cover up the details I was trying to save. I marked around the pattern piece with chalk to double check my work.

Upcycled Colorblock Tank {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}Upcycled Colorblock Tank {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}Looks good!

You’ll want to add the seam allowance to the top of this section of the shirt (as you’ll be sewing this piece and the top piece together). I, however, didn’t have any space to add a seam allowance, so I simply added some extra length to account for what I needed.

Now I have my main pieces cut out:

Upcycled Colorblock Tank {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}To complete the colorblocking, simply zig-zag stitch (width = .5, length = 2.5-3) or serge the top and bottom pieces to each other. Do this for both the front and back pieces. Then, you’ll have the front and back pieces just like in the original pattern.

For the neckband and armband, I love to use the ribbing from the original shirts. Since I have two shirts, there’s plenty of ribbing for both the armband and neckband. I like to cut as close as possible to the seam to get the ribbing off the neckline of the original shirt. You can save a little more fabric by seam ripping these necklines out, but, whew, it’s a job! Trust me, I’ve done it. It’s a whole lot simpler to just cut out, even if you do end up with a slightly skinnier piece of ribbing.Upcycled Colorblock Tank {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

Upcycled Colorblock Tank {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

From here, I followed the directions from the original pattern. Now my son has an awesome, unique, pocket tank. Thanks so much Bonnie for an awesome FREE tank pattern! Be sure to go check out the Tank pattern, available in sizes 12m-14!Colorblock Muscle Tee {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org{Colorblock Muscle Tee {Sew Thrifty | www.sewthrifty.org}

Here’s the breakdown:

Colorblocked Muscle Tee {Sew Thrifty | ww.sewthrifty.org}

And be sure to hop on over to Feather’s Flights to see her cap sleeve cardigan and cap sleeve tee!
Upcycled: Learn to Sew Your Kid's Wardrobe. A Series by Feather's Flights (feathersflights.com) and Sew Thrifty (sewthrifty.org)Have you upcycled any garments for your kids? Tag #upcycledkid on Instagram so we can see all the awesomeness you are creating! Or share a link in the comments.

Time to Travel eBook Tour: Just Like Papa Briefcase and eBook extras

Welcome Sewing with Boys readers! I am so excited to join on this eBook tour for several reasons: I have a boy (Carpenter), I love sewing for boys, I love traveling, and I’m taking my whole crew on a BIG almost cross-country road trip this summer.  So, I am going to need all the extra goodies I can get my hands on. Oh, and I don’t let my kids use mobile devices, and we barely watch TV.  Am I ready for a 2.5 day road trip with 3 kids ages 4 and under? Oh dear, just writing that out made it feel more real. But, we are going, so I am packing all the goodies I made from the Time to Travel eBook.

The eBook has 4 patterns and some fun extras. I made the Just like Papa Briefcase and the extra activities.

First up: the eBook extras

The extras include: pirate map, lacing cards, play travel documents, a nautical flag banner, and a coloring page.

For the pirate map, I used an old pair of jeans and some freezer paper to stencil on the map that was included in the eBook. I burned the edges a bit and make the jeans fray to make the map look a bit older and “real.” Before I even finished it, my kids were asking where the treasure was and how to find it! I might have to make another one for my daughter….

Time2Travel-5

I love lacing cards! My son is quite rough though and bent the last ones we had. So this time I had him help me cut, punch the holes, and color the cards. Maybe if he feels some ownership over these, he will take better care of them? Hey, one can hope. But at least if these do get damaged, we can just make some more!

Time2Travel-1

Time2Travel-2

Time2Travel-3

Also included are a driver’s license, passport, and airplane ticket. These are so fun – I just need to pop in a photo of Carpenter and we’re all set!

Time2Travel-12

{Where’s my passport pic, mama? I’m ready to go to Nicaragua!}

I had intentions of making Carpenter a matching game with the nautical flag banner pattern but haven’t gotten around to it yet. Our trip isn’t until July though, so I know it will get done before then.

Next: Just Like Papa Briefcase

I was so excited to make this briefcase! About 2 years ago I had purchased the Birch travel fabric and brown corduroy to make Carpenter a bag and never got around to making it. So this tour was a great shove to get moving and make that case.

On one side there are “stickers” of where Carpenter has been and on the other side is where he plans to go soon with a few extra blank ones for future destinations. As I was making these, I realized he’s a pretty well-traveled little guy at only 4 years old. We are very blessed that we can offer the world to our kids and hope they blossom because of their travels.

Time2Travel-6

Time2Travel-7

I used the Birch fabric for the inside pockets. The outside of the briefcase is a brown corduroy I scored at a thrift store for $2 (for 3 yards!), and the yellow lining fabric was gifted to me.

Time2Travel-9

Time2Travel-8

Time2Travel-16
Time to go!
Time2Travel-14
Does anyone know where the bus stop is?
Time2Travel-15
Oh, I see it, over there!
Time2Travel-17
Hurry, I’m going to be late!
Time2Travel-13
And now I’m early…guess I’ll just sit here.
Time2Travel-11
At least I’ve got lots of fun things to do!
Time2Travel-10
Yay, here’s my bus!

Here’s the breakdown:

image

I didn’t include the time it took to manually draw each of the unique stickers (about 2 hours) on the outside of the briefcase. Also, these were the 3rd, 4th, and 5th zippers I have ever sewn, so if you’re more experienced, this briefcase probably won’t take you as long.

Thanks so much for visiting with me on tour, and I hope you’ll stick around to see just how fun and thrifty sewing can be!

You can purchase the full eBook here

SWBbutton
Enter the Rafflecopter below to win one of these fantastic prizes:
Grand prize: $50 gift certificate to FabricWorm and a copy of Time to Travel*

2nd: 1 yard of fabric from Mabel Madison and a copy of Time to Travel*

3rd: a copy of Time to Travel*

*If you buy the eBook and win the giveaway, they will either refund your money, or send the copy on to a friend of your choice.

But, that’s not all! If you buy the eBook during the tour, you’ll be automatically entered to win a $30 gift certificate to Fat Quarter Shop!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Check out these other amazing blogs for more inspiration with the Time to Travel eBook!

April 20: Rachel at Once Upon A Sewing Machine || Michelle at Falafel and the Bee

April 21: Becca at Free Notion || Heather at All Things Katy!

April 22: Chelsea at GYCT Designs || Ula at Lulu & Celeste

April 23: Stephanie at Swoodson Says || Sherri at Thread Riding Hood

April 24: Meriel at Create3.5 || Sara at Made by Sara

April 27: Melissa at Oh Sew Boy! || Stacey at Boy, Oh Boy, Oh Boy Crafts

April 28: Teri at Climbing the Willow || Ajaire at Call Ajaire

April 29: Jessica at The Berry Bunch || Dana at Sew Thrifty

April 30: Stacey at From-a-Box || Maegen at Mae & K

May 1: Kelly at Handmade Boy || Roxanne at Pen, Seb & Rox

See ya Later (Alligator)! {Kid’s Clothes Week: Days 2 & 3}

When I first found out about Kid’s Clothes Week’s theme WILD Things, I had just taken my crew to the local zoo. And Carpenter was all about the alligators….that we didn’t even see. And I’m not even sure we have alligators at our zoo, which is hilarious because we have alligators in the water about 1 mile from our house. Yes, I’ve seen them. And yes, I’m terrified. And yes, Carpenter wanted to get closer. Um, no.

But, the dude likes alligators and that was his animal of choice, so here we go! The idea in my head was to combine pieces of old t-shirts to create the stripes of an alligator’s belly for the front of the tank. Initially, I was going to make it an ombre style look, but then realized I just didn’t have the proper greens to make it work. So, I found these two olive greens that were slightly different and decided to stick with just those two to make the stripes.  Then added a pocket because Carpenter requests pockets. Always.

AlligatorTank-1

For the back, I did the stripes vertically to mimic the back of an alligator, and then the shirt just took on a mind of its own. I added the graphic “See you later (alligator)” and pieced the whole tank together. And THEN, the tank was begging for me to really make the back look like alligator ridges, so I cut little triangles all down the center of the back. Phew. Done.

AlligatorTank-2

AlligatorTank-3

{CHOMP!}

AlligatorTank-4

And he likes it!

AlligatorTank-5

See you later! (seriously, come back tomorrow for my last little WILD thing of the week)

I used FishSticks Designs FREE Tank pattern, some leftover gray ribbing, a scrap of black from a Target jersey sheet, and 2 old green t-shirts.

Here’s the breakdown:

image

Garments of Kids Clothes Weeks’ Past

It’s like the ghosts of Christmas past, except not really. Anyway…since it always takes longer to sew and blog about something than just to sew it, I’m going to preview this Kid’s Clothes Week with some garments I’ve sewn up in previous seasons. And here’s to hoping I’m able to make and blog throughout the week!

This post contains affiliate links. If you click on one of the links noted by an *, I will receive some compensation if you purchase something.

Fall 2014 {Theme: Storybook}

My kids needed clothes during this KCW, so I didn’t follow the theme. I had big plans for this week and didn’t achieve all of them, but I did make 2 pairs of pants and 1 top for Carpenter, and 1 top for River.

KCWPast-1

 Treasure Pocket Pants from Sewing for Boys: 24 Projects to Create a Handmade Wardrobe*. Fabric from an old pair of khakis and rocket fabric.

KCWPast-2

 Deer Bimaa with fabric from Girl Charlee *

KCWPast-3

 Viking Hoodie. Pattern from Ottobre (4/2014) , fabric from Kitschy Coo

Winter 2015 {Theme: Upcycle}

I was so excited about this theme, I could hardly handle it…and then I got carpal tunnel half-way through the week. I was still able to muscle out 3 shirts for Carpenter and some footed pants for Lioness though.KCWPast-6

Raw-Edged Raglan from Sewing for Boys: 24 Projects to Create a Handmade Wardrobe*.  Fabric was a white t-shirt and a pink Target jersey sheet.

KCWPast-4

Snap Button v-neck (without the snaps, ha) from Ottobre 1/2013. Fabric from a men’s XL shirt and teal jersey scrap.

KCWPast-5

Another Raw-Edged Raglan from Sewing for Boys: 24 Projects to Create a Handmade Wardrobe.*  Fabric upcycled from two Old Navy shirts.

As you can see, I’m a bit in love with the Sewing for Boys book and Ottobre too. In the coming months I’m going to share with you about how I chose and what matters to me when it comes to patterns.

Now, here’s to a productive Kid’s Clothes Week!

Tutorial: Update Baby Clothes for the Warm Season

UpdateBodysuitHeader

One of the best ways to be thrifty is to refashion old clothes into new ones. And this tutorial will show you just about the easiest way possible to do that! Follow along to see how you can change baby bodysuits from winter (long sleeve) into spring/summer (short sleeve) attire.

BabyBodySuitUpdate{Throughout this tutorial, I am updating 6-9 month bodysuits}

Materials necessary

Long sleeve bodysuits (search your previous baby’s stash, hit up your friends, go thrifting, or check out a local garage sale! Be sure to wash the garment first if it hasn’t been previously washed just in case there might be some shrinkage)
Scissors or rotary cutter
Iron
Thread (coordinating or contrasting, depending on what look you like)
Twin needle (optional)

Instructions

Step 1: Cut sleeves
Step 2: Iron sleeves
Step 3: Sew sleeves

This is really so simple, so let’s get started:

First step: Cut off the sleeves. I measured another bodysuit of the same size that already had short sleeves. If you don’t have that, just give a guess (and add a little); you can always cut off more later if necessary.

BabyClothesUpdateTutorial

  I ended up cutting off 4.5″ on this one and a little less on the others, since their sleeves were a bit shorter in the original bodysuit.

Step 2: Fold sleeve under 3/8″ and press. You don’t have to do anything to the edges of these sleeves since they are knit. You could serge or zig-zag the edges if you’d prefer though.

BabyClothesUpdateTutorial2

Step 3: Finish/sew the hems. I wanted to try several methods for finishing the sleeves.

First up: single needle! This method is for those of you out there who haven’t invested in a twin needle. I highly recommend a twin needle and they aren’t much of an investment, but just in case you don’t have one, here’s another way to hem your knit edges.

As I usually do with knits, I chose a zig-zag stitch with the shortest width possible (.5 on my machine).  This stitch looks straight, but gives a bit of a stretch and is the best stitch to use when working with knits. Then I added a second stitch to mimic the look of a professionally finished garment. It’s nearly impossible to get the two lines to match up, but I did my best.

BabyShirtUpdateSingleNeedle

As you can see, this finish isn’t perfect. I think I might go back and use the tissue paper method (see below) while using a single needle.  But, I wanted to show those of you without a double needle how you can finish the hem of your bodysuit.

Next up: the double needle.

Double Needle

BabyClothesUpdateSleeve

This one turned out fine, but I definitely had to iron the hem to make it a bit straighter.

 Finally, I decided to try the tissue paper method I recently read about. I was a bit skeptical at first. I mean, I like to get things done quickly and really didn’t want to add time to hemming. BUT, for the sake of showing different methods, I tried it. And can I tell you, I am a TOTAL convert! I will never sew a knit hem again without tissue paper. Once you finish sewing the hem, simply rip apart the attached tissue paper like so:

Tissue Paper Method

And be amazed at your incredibly professionally looking hem:

Baby Clothes Update Hearts Sleeve2

So. Much. Better!!

There you have it. Four “new” bodysuits all ready for your lovely baby to enjoy this spring or summer!

BabyClothesUpdate4

BabyClothesUpdate4Full

Then let your baby enjoy his/her new clothes!

BabyBodysuitUpdateG

Here’s the breakdown:

BodysuitsCostandTime.jpeg

So, what are you waiting for?! Go look through your kids’ baby clothes, bug your friends for some hand-me-downs or hit up the next garage sale and find some bodysuits for updating!

BabyBodysuitUpdateG-2

Your baby will thank you!

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Project Run & Play: Star Student Muscle Tee

When the Project Run & Play challenge for February was announced, I was just about beside myself!  The tutorial, from Living with Punks, was the Mademoiselle Muscle Tee. I LOVE muscle tees! One of the first items I started sewing for my son was a muscle tee. So, I knew I was going to create a look for my son, and tailor it to fit him perfectly.

My son LOVES to read (seriously, when he was a 1 year old he would sit still longer than most 3 year olds if someone was reading to him). He also loves school and is very smart, picking up concepts faster than I can even comprehend.  I wanted to create a look that was centered around the idea of his big Brain muscle, but also look cool. We’re pretty big nerds in our family (Doctor Who, anyone? And I may have an advanced degree in applied statistics. Oh, and my husband is a gamer and a programmer. Yea, nerds.) But nerds can look cool too, right?
starstudentmuscletee-6
Since my son is in preschool at home, school looks like the woods, the beach, the kitchen, and anywhere else where we can explore, get messy, and learn by doing.
starstudentmuscletee-13
The shirt was created to celebrate my son’s accomplishments. Preschool is about fun and play and encouraging learning of all kinds. Stars are a great way to show kids that they did a good job (plus I love a good star fabric, so it was a no-brainer).
I used a raw-edge raglan look for the shoulders and kept the sleeve edges raw as well. The star was appliqued on with an orange contrast stitching. The gray fabric was upcycled from an old men’s t-shirt. I even cut out the neckline from the men’s shirt and cut it down to fit this muscle tee. All fabrics except the gray were from Girl Charlee (aff link).
starstudentmuscletee
These shorts are supposed to mimic a piece of paper – stripes with thicker sections in between. I was going to place letters on the shorts, but once I got the look together, I just loved it this way – nice and simple. These shorts are made from a ponte knit with scrap ribbing for the pocket outlines. The cording is taken from the bags a Target sheet comes in {FREE!}.
And here’s the breakdown:
Muscle Tee:
StarMuscleTeeCostandTime.jpeg

Green Baggies:

GreenBaggiesCostandTime.jpeg

saier-muscle-tee-1

(You wanna piece of me?)

starstudentmuscletee-3

(Just kidding, I’m really very sweet)

Now, go check out all the other amazing entries this month!

 

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